VIDEO PRODUCTION
Written by: Michael Cannon
Filmed by: Michael Cannon, Kathy Hill
Produced by: Michael Cannon
Music: Michael Cannon
Starring: Madeline
Invisible 2014 © Michael Cannon. A music video of the title track to the album 'Invisible' by Michael Cannon. Thanks to star Madeline, Oliver and parents Ross & Jodi, actor Michael Edgar for his powerful recitem of the decree on the sound recording, Burnie Regional Museum, Leighland Christian School Ulverstone, and to all who agreed to be a part of the video.

Music by: Michael Cannon
Filmed & Produced: National Film and Sound Archive
Michael Cannon performed his song '100 Miles (Emu Bay)' as guest of the NFSA's Cooee Cabaret at the Burnie Arts Theatre, Tasmania in February 2012.

National Film and Sound Archive


VIDEO PRODUCTION
Written by: Michael Cannon
Filmed by: Archival footage courtesy of National Film and Sound Archive
Produced by: Michael Cannon
Music: Michael Cannon’s interpretation of Jack Lumsdane’s
Thanks to: Brendan Smith, NFSA
In answer to an invitation by the National Film & Sound Archives to help celebrate Canberra's centenary, I've created a version of the original recording of 'Canberra's Calling to You', written by Jack Lumsdane, in 1938. Raw archival footage kindly made available by NF&SA for this project.

VIDEO PRODUCTION
Music: ‘100 Miles’, written, performed and produced by Michael Cannon
Photography, film and video production by Design Eye Creative
Sound recording: Thanks to Gerry O’Neill, NF&SA at The Burnie Regional Art Gallery, 14 June 2014
As part of the touring 'Art of Sound' collaborative project in June 2014, I received an invitation by the National Film & Sound Archive to perform several of my compositions at a workshop to demonstrate wax cylinder sound recording. I had previously composed the song '100 Miles' in answer to an invitation to recognise 1890’s construction of the first rail links from Emu Bay (Burnie) to the Waratah tin mines in Tasmania's west, and seemed to me to be a perfect song to perform on the Edison Standard D phonograph with technology that dated back to a similar time. This version of the song found on my 2014 CD titled ‘Invisible’ underwent a transformation to best compliment the wax cylinder recording method; the tempo increased because of recording time limitations and to increase the likelihood of the guitar signal being clearly heard.

National Film and Sound Archive, Wax Cylinder Project